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Protective pillows, too risky for children

Protective pillows, too risky for children



Pediatric specialists from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis announces that the risk of death or accidental injury associated with bedspreads is far greater than the benefits, HealthDay reports.
Many people use bed cushions or strollers to protect their children. But the researchers reviewed data from 1985 to 2005 and discovered 27 accidental deaths of children aged between one month and 2 years, deaths from choking or strangulation with protective cushions or the wires with which these cushions are attached. Specialists also discovered 25 injuries caused by protective pillows.
It seems that 11 children suffocated when their face was resting on cushions, 13 died when they were caught between pillows and another object and 3 children died by strangulation with cushion cords.
Specialists say that many children lack the motor skills to release themselves when locked between pillows and another surface and suffocated because they breathe the same air or because their nose and mouth are pressed.
Researchers warn that soft and strong pillows are dangerous. If they are too soft, the baby can suffocate, and if they are too strong, the child can climb on them and fall out of the crib.
Alina Sica
Editor
October 24, 2007